Invasive species

Freshwater ecosystems are among the richest but also the most endangered ecosystems in the world. Along with water drainage, excessive use of water, changes in hydrological regimes and pollution, invasive foreign species represent a growing threat to our wetlands, rivers, lakes and other wetlands.

In these areas invasive species spread rapidly, are difficult to observe, and when finally discovered, they can hardly be removed. Invasive species which get into our waters displace our native species in the struggle for food and shelter, or by transmitting diseases, and much harm can be done in karst water flows, the habitat to many rare and endemic species.

In freshwater ecosystems, invasive invertebrates represent a major threat. Their arrival and the impact is more difficult to notice than the impact of invasive vertebrates (e.g., rainbow trout, nutria, muskrat), and therefore it is usually too late for a timely reaction.

In freshwater ecosystems, invasive invertebrates represent a major threat. Their arrival and the impact is more difficult to notice than the impact of invasive vertebrates (e.g., rainbow trout, nutria, muskrat), and therefore it is usually too late for a timely reaction.